09 | 30 | 23

Season 2, Episode 6: “When, How and Whether to Foist the Dharma Upon Your Children, Part I: ‘Sometimes Daddy Needs to Kill.'”

In today’s episode, we begin our series on when—if ever—is the appropriate time to try to make your baby Buddhist. But first, we discuss the joys and travails of traveling with the infant set. Next we ask, Are the deepest aspects of dhamma practice really available to anyone, or is there a platinum tier for… Continue reading Season 2, Episode 6: “When, How and Whether to Foist the Dharma Upon Your Children, Part I: ‘Sometimes Daddy Needs to Kill.’”

09 | 30 | 23

Meditation: Who even has time to meditate?

In this guided practice, Cara recognizes that the normal out of their mind, out of their breath, and out of their depth parent might not have time for what we think of as a formal sitting meditation practice. So what if, Cara asks, we could scrape the very gunk of life off the surface of… Continue reading Meditation: Who even has time to meditate?

07 | 09 | 23

Season 2, Episode Five: “Resting Buddha Face.”

In today’s episode, we begin by discussing the subtle art of preparing dhamma talks for meditation retreats. Later, we ask, Do humans have an instinctual orientation towards compassion, kindness, and love—or do we only get there by pushing past our darker impulses?  Still later, we explore exactly how much we should trust our children, and… Continue reading Season 2, Episode Five: “Resting Buddha Face.”

07 | 09 | 23

Meditation: An especially safe space.

Jess leads us in a riff on “metta” or “loving-kindness” practice, in which we are invited to imagine an ideal mother figure, as a way of calling forth the ideal maternal qualities that may be hiding in our own minds and hearts. Then, we use those qualities to establish a secure base for how we… Continue reading Meditation: An especially safe space.

04 | 30 | 23

Season 2, Episode Four: “Talk, Monkey!”

In today’s episode, I seem to have no idea what I’m getting myself into when I ask Jess and Cara to comment on whether my son’s insistence that I speak to him through a monkey-shaped hand-puppet is a peculiarity capable of  revealing any dhamma-adjacent truths. Before long, we’ve delved into a doctrinal debate about whether or… Continue reading Season 2, Episode Four: “Talk, Monkey!”

04 | 30 | 23

Meditation: A place to rest the mind.

Jess gifts us with a meditation especially designed for parents, who may already feel like they’re figure-skating on the edge of a razor blade, and don’t need their meditation practice to be one more veldt they have to hack through. Hell, this meditation is one you can even do in bed, or wherever you happen… Continue reading Meditation: A place to rest the mind.

03 | 04 | 23

Season 2, Episode Three: “The Toilet-Mat Tantra.”

Today’s episode is a conversational free-for-all; or maybe a conversation in freefall? Jess and I crack open a veritable candy-sack of topics related to the dhamma of parenting. How do our children alert us when we’re not being mindful enough? What are the things we’re letting ourselves let go of, in hopes of becoming better parents?… Continue reading Season 2, Episode Three: “The Toilet-Mat Tantra.”

01 | 05 | 23

Season 2, Episode Two: “Whose Body is This?”

Today’s episode is a sonic rocket ride to the past. Back, in fact, to a series of conversations which Jess and Jon recorded in the final few weeks before Jess’s son was born. This is a snapshot view of how a dhamma teacher in the throes of the pregnant condition deals with the realization that the… Continue reading Season 2, Episode Two: “Whose Body is This?”

01 | 05 | 23

Meditation: “This wild, raw, and magnificent world.”

Jess offers a guided equanimity meditation that riffs on the dialogue we were having during Episode Two of Season 2, specifically, how sensations of anxiety, even terror, that might crop up around aspects of one’s own pregnancy; over the state of the world; over our knowledge that we have so little control over what happens… Continue reading Meditation: “This wild, raw, and magnificent world.”